pil pil
BECK, Hermann Michelsen
(1774-1811)
GRØN, Anna Maria Jonasdatter
(1769-1851)
HAGEN, Iver Christensen
(1794-1869)
HERMANNSDATTER, Anna Maria
(1798-1881)

HALD, Maren Iversdatter
(1830-1917)

 

Familie

Ægtefæller/børn:
1. FRIMANN, Jacob Jacobsen

HALD, Maren Iversdatter

  • Født: 23.12.1830, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt
  • Dåb: 26.12.1830, Sønder Stenderup Kirke, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt
  • Ægteskab (1): FRIMANN, Jacob Jacobsen den 07.10.1854 i hjemmet, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt
  • Død: 28.09.1917, Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt i en alder af 86 år
  • Begravet: 03.10.1917, Sønder Stenderup Kirkegård, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt
Billede

punkttegn  Notater:

Birth: Page 26.

At the time of her marriage Maren was a seamstress.

Death: Page 184. Maren Iversdatter Frimann, born Hald. A widow of the weaver Jacob Jacobsen Frimann who died 4th May 1905 in the town and parish of Stenderup. She was born here 23rd December, 1830, being a daughter of Iver Christensen Hald, living for rent, and his wife Anne Marie Hermandsdatter. 86 years old.

Billede

punkttegn  Om

• FT-1835, 01.02.1835, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Stenderup udflyttere.

• FT-1840, 01.02.1840, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Stenderup udflyttere, parcelbygning.

• FT-1845, 01.02.1845, Stenderup, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, lejebolig.

• Konfirmation, 05.04.1846, Sønder Stenderup Kirke, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt.

• FT-1855, 01.03.1855, Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, hus.

• FT-1860, 01.02.1860, Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, hus.

• FT-1870, 01.02.1870, Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, hus.

• FT-1880, 01.02.1880, Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, hus.

• FT-1890, 01.02.1890, Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, hus.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Jes Frimann, 16.03.1892.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

To Jesse

Dear Son,

I thank you for your kind offer. You will help Paul and send him a ticket. Do not send any. We will write again.

I believe now Iver is coming home so it would be best to travel with him. We had a letter from him in January when he was in Omaha. Then he wrote it had been his intention to be home in the fall, but thought it too tiresome to come in the winter. He would rather wait for summer. He wrote that he had bought a piece of land but he had it rented out so I am sure he is coming. Yes, I expect him now every day. Has he got our letter, or if you know anything about where he is, ask him to write to us.

It is my fault that Paul is waiting for him. He thinks he can easily go, but it is not all so easy for such a one who has never been anywhere before. He can travel accompanied later in the summer.

Cathrine promised to write to you.

Many affectionate greetings to your wife and children and you from your parents and grandparents.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 19.09.1892.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode lille Paul,

It is quite a while since I have written this time, but you will excuse me. Thank God you are well and getting along well. It is very hard work for I think everything requires great care in a mill. I think it could be very dangerous for you.

It won't be long till they are finished with the harvest here, but where you are it was finished long ago. Here the big farms are not finished yet. There has been an abundant harvest, but it is difficult to get it in. Meir Bruhn harvested September 10th. That was late, but he was not the last. We are well, thank God. Your father has been at Bruhn's place recently.

I know no more news to tell you. Thomas Frost went to America late in August. Peder Holst has come home. I have not talked to him, but I saw him yesterday. Now he is through with sailing. I should not wish him to go to America, especially where you are. Beware of him, lille Paul. He is not good.

Write now immediately and tell us everything. There must be much that we cannot imagine. Has Jesse a big garden and lots of fruit and flowers? Tell me a little about how Iver is. How is it with cholera? Here there has been an awful time. The sickness has not been in Denmark, but it has been blocked at the border and watched for on shore that none could come from Germany. The sickness has been hard, especially in Hamburg. Almost no ships or mail go there.

Greetings from Wrang's and your Morbroder if they themselves have not written. I have not talked with them for the last two weeks. I have been very busy. Can you imagine, Dairyman Knudsen and his wife had a daughter recently so I have been there to help them.

I also hope that you will remember you have sisters called Cathrine and Thea and Maria.

Now I beg you, lille Paul, greet Jesse, his wife and children many many times from us, and Iver, Uncle Wind and Tante.

From your loving parents.

Thorvald Lorensen has written to you. He is afraid you have not received the letter.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.01.1893.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Lille gode Paul,

I must not call you lille any longer. I long to see your picture... you are so big now. I thank you for your letter and your Christmas gift. You often said that you would give me a new spinning wheel... now can you believe I have got myself one for that money. I say now that this one came from America.

We missed you so much at Christmas... if only you are contented and well, that is good. There were not many Christmas holidays this year, and none of your friends were here New Year Eve except Karl Stenderup, who sends greetings.

P. Holst has gone again to learn shoemaking in Kolding. He does not look at all well. I think Marie has written, and Wrang's. I must now see to little Dorthea, who has caught a cold. We are certainly having a severe winter. I cannot remember when we have had such hard frost.

I don't know any news to tell you. Write soon and tell us everything. I ask you to greet Tante and Uncle Wind and P. Wind and your brother Iver and wish him a happy birthday from us and happy New Year. We shall celebrate it here at home.

Goodbye lille Paul.

Your loving parents.

Write soon.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.01.1894.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode lille Paul,

It is now already a long time since we got your letter. It is the greatest pleasure for us to hear from you and your brothers and families. I am glad Jesse is well again. Things are not easy with so many small children. I hope you are well and contented. It is not so good this year for you and not with us either. We pray and hope for better times.

Nis Hatt and wife are here now, and I have talked with her. She said you were all well. I am afraid you will become discouraged when you are not earning anything, but it is very good for you to go to school. I don't know when Hatt's are going back.

I hope you will forgive me for not writing. You know from the time you were home that I put things off for a long time. I write every day in my thoughts. We are well, but there is not much work. There is no poverty, but for us there will not be much better times as your father is getting old. Dorthea is home this winter. She will perhaps get another place next summer.

It is a year today since sister Maria was home the last time. We certainly missed her at Christmas. I could see her every day but never be able to talk with her, and such it is also with you, but it is different. I know that she suffers no more. Perhaps it is not impossible that I should see you again if I should live some years, though it is unreasonable to ask that you should take such an expensive journey.

We thank you for the picture of you with the mill. Those who have seen it could certainly recognize you. All your friends say to tell Paul hello. P. Holst got your address at Christmas. Thorvald Lorensen would like to go over where you are. He had decided to next spring, but now he is thinking of going sooner. He is anxious about the hard times.

Greetings to Jess, his wife and children from us. I think one of them write once to us. Greetings to Iver from us and wish him a happy birthday... also good wishes to you for your birthday, and we wish that you may keep your health and live contented.

Much love to you, dear little Paul, from your ever affectionate father and mother.

Maren Frimann.

Also greetings from your sister Thea.

Write soon.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 11.03.1894.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

We thank you many times for writing. It is the greatest and almost the only pleasure we have to hear from your brothers and families. There are many sick here, but not many have died in Stenderup. Old Andreas Thomsen died this winter. In Bjert parish many have died. We were also sick in February. It was influenza... but now thank God we are well.

Dorthea went to work the first of March at Mads Tønses (Foens - Vanghavegaard?) at Agtrup Mark. Their girl is going to America so there will be no one there. In the summer she will go to N. Moos.

Cathrine and her family are well. They are coming home at Easter. He now has acquired two white horses. I think the horse dealer took too much. The milk route cannot pay so much.

Now Nis Hatt's are going back to America. They went from S. Stenderup the 6th of February, but they left Koebenhavn the 15th. I am sending a little something along to you which she should give to Tante Maria. I had written to Uncle Wind. I hope they got the letter. There were some bed spreads for Tante and two pieces of crocheting, also a white cover for Petrea Frimann, and two tie pins for Iver and one for you. I bought three home from Kolding and when I looked at them one was broken. It could not be sent, and it was only the day before they were to leave and I was sick, so it could not be helped. Perhaps Anna Hatt will come home next summer and then I will send something else. I would have knit some socks for you and Iver but Madame Hatt thought nobody uses them... her sons do not... but it was that they take up too much room. Dear Paul, let me know whether the things come.

Greetings from Morbroder. He intends to write to you but thinks he will wait till summer when he has his picture taken, and then you will get the picture, too. Also from Wrang's. Maria will soon write to you, and from Ole Adsboel... and first and last greetings to you and brother and wife and children from their loving parents and Tante Dorthea.

Your mother, Maren Frimann.

Greetings from S. Garles. You remember he was often at Baker Schnurre's. He wonders whether you could not get him some used foreign stamps.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 25.08.1894.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

The date was written as "August 25", - no year. Our guess is 1894.

Dear good Paul,

Today I will really write to you. It has been a long time, but you know of course that I am awkward at writing. You may be sure that I think about you a great deal. We wish you luck with your new position. If only you may succeed at it. It is certainly better than learning watchmaking. You would certainly be two years at learning and that is too dull for you.

We are pretty well, thank God. Your father is in the field today for the first time. The harvest is good here this year. It has been a raw and cold summer. Now it is a bit warmer. It won't be long before we will have short days.

I don't think there is anything to tell here. I think Karen Adsboel has told you a great deal. She is a good seamstress but not anxious to earn. She is just as big as her mother.

I hope that Cathrine has written to Jesse. Perhaps also to you. She promised me that for sure. They were home three weeks ago.

Greet Jesse many times from us. I hope Petrea excuses me because I do not write. Cathrine can do it better. I think mine is too plain. Also many good wishes to you and keep well.

From your loving parents.

Let me know whether you want Ugens Nyheder this winter.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 16.03.1895.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I hear from your sister Cathrine's letter that you did not get my letter. I believe it was the 11th of January I sent it. It was addressed to Jesse and one inside for you, which I asked them to give to you, but they didn't get their letter either. It is too bad.

We thank you many times for your Christmas presents. It is too much for you to spare. You have not earned anything the last two years. You can be sure it is about over with your father's work now. They can buy everything cheap now in shops, and he is too old for farm work. We are well, however.

I send greetings from all the family. In my letter I wished you happiness on your birthday, and I have not made you a present. They shall wait till you come home.

I need a little rake. The one you made me is in pieces.

I hope you have the other letter by the time you get this one so that you will write at once. Greet Jesse and his family from us. In case you don't get the letter, be a little bit careful next time. I cannot quite follow the writing.

We send our best wishes and love - from your loving parents.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 26.03.1895.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Now I am really going to write to you. It is already a long time since we got your letter. I hope you got my last letter which I meant, you know, for your birthday. I have not much to write about. We are pretty well, thank God. It has really been a hard winter. It has probably been so too where you are where food and work are hard to get. I think a lot about how you will get by in the summer.

I am worried that you should travel and wander about so much and come to nothing. There are two sons of Peter Beck - you know them - who will do nothing.

Johannes Bramsen went to America again March 16th. He is engaged to Bodel Adsboel, who went with him. They were to get married when they got there, if it comes to anything.

I send you greetings from those in Hejls. They had a little girl eight days ago. I hope they are well. I have not heard from them the past few days. Your sister Dorthea is there now.

Greetings also from Thorvald Lorensen. He has written a letter. He is in service for Uldal's at your Morbroder. Greetings also from Morbroder, also from Wrang's. Niels Wrang will be there this summer. He worked at Bjert last summer, where he unfortunately broke a leg.

We are well here. Dear little Paul, you must write us right away how you are and whether you have moved. I would like to know how Jess is. You may be sure I think of you a great deal. Iver is apparently buried alive. We never hear from him. Perhaps he will write for Father's birthday.

Greet Jesse from us all and Iver if you talk to him.

Your ever effectionate parents.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 8.1896.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear Son,

I will try to write to you today. I am poor at writing, but we thank you many times for your very welcome letters and your thoughtfulness in writing. We are happy to hear that you are well and doing well and have become a converted and believing person. From what we have heard, it is not easy to understand. There are here many who call themselves thus, but there are but few that I think really are.

No persons can be perfected and without sin unless they are Pharisees and receive only according to their own profit: pride and vanity. That I think I do not belong to. I am very pleased with the last words in your letter - God's peace till we see each other again, which means there could be hope of seeing you and talking to you - although when I think of it, it is a costly journey. You will work a long time for it.

We think it was odd that you moved from Jesse's place, but you have not had a quarrel with him. Can you not tell us a little about it and how Iver is when you write. It is more than three years since he has written to us. He wrote to Cathrine but not even a greeting to us. Perhaps he is married. Then you could ride out to him some Sunday since you have such a good bicycle. It would be nice to have such a ride. Jesse is doing very well. I cannot understand that they did not get the letter I wrote in January. There was one to you in it, and you did not get that.

Greet them all from us. I cannot at all imagine what Jesse looks like. I would be so glad to get a picture of him and his wife and his children. I hope we will get one soon.

We are now in the harvest. It is ready and the grain is good around here. We have had a dry summer, and the grass is yellow. Your father goes out in the harvest, but he cannot do much.

We are all well, thank God. Your sister Dorthea is working in Bjert. I send you greetings from her and Morbroder. Cathrine and family were here last Sunday, and Rasmus Wrang's Maria wrote.

Now best wishes to you and the Lord give you health.

From your loving parents.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 12.10.1896.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode lille Paul,

We thank you for your welcome letter. We were so anxious to hear from you. Things are certainly not good where you are. There is no grain and no work. You earned something in the summer, didn't you? However, it is certainly too bad when you are not earning in the winter. It will be better again with God's help.

How is Jesse? I would like so much to hear from them. They never write, nor does Iver. Yes, you may be sure I miss you. It troubles me that you have such hard times there. It was that way before you left, and it had been the same at home. It is just as bad now. Around here there was corn enough this year but it doesn't bring much. I believe 100 oere. Wheat costs 4 kr. The other kinds I don't know the price of.

You write that there were Home Missionaries where you are. They must be false. Watch out for them. Home Missionaries are not rebaptized. They must be Mormons or Baptists. Don't have anything to do with them, lille Paul. Don't have yourself rebaptized. The baptism you have received is good enough. What does Jesse say about them? I cannot imagine why he does not write to us. Write soon, lille Paul. It is so good to hear from you.

There is not much to tell you. Jes Sandager is going for a soldier next spring. P. Holst is working in Koebenhavn this summer. Greetings from Morbroder Hald and Wrang's. They are well and so are sister Cathrine and family and Dorthea. She is coming home in November. She would write to you but that should wait till Marie Thulstrup is engaged, which will not be long. It will be with merchant Hansen in Kolding where you bought your suit.

Now I ask you to greet Jes and his family from us and Iver if you talk with him. We wish all good things that the Lord will grant you from your old, ever affectionate parents.

Good night, lille Paul.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 02.11.1896.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good son,

We thank you for your letter. You may be sure it is a great pleasure to hear from you. But you have been ill. I cannot imagine how things are with you when you sleep at one place and get your meals at another. Is it so far from everyone, and don't you go to Jesse? You must tell me something about that and how you are. Isn't the bank open again?

Rasmus Wrang has written to you. He would like to persuade you to go home to run his mill. He is taking his land back so he will be working it. It is a good chance. Let me know what you think about it.

I am now getting off to you the Ugens Nyheder. I wish I had them for the month of October, but I don't. I am sending a couple later in the week.

On Sunday, the 8th, our old pastor is holding his 25th jubilee as pastor in Stenderup. Berg is now parish clerk here in Stenderup. Petersen took his retirement with pension. He could not stand to stay longer, also he had become so pious as they call it, and that suited his foolish disposition. Olga Berg is a teacher. You may be sure she is grand. (Picture attached of Olga Kristine Berg).

I don't know any more this time. We are well, thank God. I don't know whether Cathrine has written to you. They are all pretty well.

Greet Jesse from us all and tell us a bit about how you are getting along and also Iver if you have heard anything from him. And our best wishes to you from your loving parents and from you sister Dorthea.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 05.12.1896.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

The date was written as "December 5", - no year. Our guess is 1896.

Gode Paul,

We thank you for your letter. It makes us happy to hear from you and know that you are well. You are not making much headway with earning, but it is good that you are learning something. Things will be better again.

I don't know whether you have heard that Thilsse's sons were in America - Olav and Christian. They went with Erik Hatt last year. They have now come home. They got tired of it over there.

I don't know any news. We are pretty well, which is the important thing.

Greetings from sister Cathrine and family. They were here last Sunday, and they are well. And from Dorthea. She is in Hejls just now. You asked whether Iver Wrang is around. He is in Odense at his mother's. Ole Wiuff is home. Olga Berg is in Koebenhavn studying to be a teacher. Lorens Holm is engaged to Mette Staugaard (married 18.11.1897).

In closing we wish you all a happy Christmas and a good and blessed New Year and health to you.

Your loving parents.

Greet your brother Iver if you happen to talk with him, perhaps at Christmas, and those at Uncle Wind's place.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 1897.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

The date: The 29th ? 1897.

Gode Paul,

We thank you for the pictures (one included of Paul Freeman). We could not have recognized you if we had not known it was you. You have changed a great deal. It is 5 1/2 years since you left. Thank God you are well.

I will see if I can find out the whereabouts of Torval Lorensen. I thought he was in service, but your Morbroder says he came home right away as soon as he was free. He has been very dissipated. I don't know where he is now. His mother died. They have no home at all. P. Holst is home. He came home with climate fever.

Affectionate greetings from the family, especially your parents.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 12.11.1899.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Lille gode Paul,

Now I shall really write to you. It is a long time since we got your welcome letter. It made us happy to hear that you have health and a better year. It will be better than the last, and you are working and can earn something. Here there is an abundance of grain, but it is not bringing a good price.

There is not much to write about. We are well, thank God. Those in Hejls are well except that Cathrine has a sore hand. She has trouble doing her work. She now has three children. Dorthea was there a while in the summer, but they could not get along well at all. She was at Sandager's. Cathrine Sandager went out to seek her fortune. She went far from Jylland to Grenen. Jes Sandager has gone to Lolland and is a herdsman, and Henrik is a farm manager in Sjaelland. They are far from one another now. They have only Jens at home. Lauritz is in service at Jensen Uldal at your Morbroder. I send you his regards.

You may believe, lille gode Paul, I have so much trouble writing, and when I finally get started I don't know anything to write. I hope you will not consider me indifferent. I understand that you have not got my letter that I wrote you in the summer. It was addressed to Jes. Iver we never hear from. I have not written to thim then, but it gives me pain that he does not care enough for his old parents to write once in a while. Greet him and Uncle Wind and Tante if you go there at Christmas. Greet Jesse and wife and children many, many times from us. I always hope to see you once more. I think often of Iver not coming since he is 40 years now.

In closing, many kind regards and best wishes for all good, good health from your father and mother.

M. Frimann.

Write a long letter soon.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.01.1900.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good Paul,

I will now see to writing to you. We wish you luck with the undertaking and hope you will be successful in learning. I think about it a lot. I think it is a very conscientious kind of work at a station with trains, but I cannot at all imagine what it is like. I hope you will stay healthy. It is, I suppose, expensive to learn, but when you have learned it and get a place, you will get good wages.

We are fairly well; some have colds. It is a hard winter here. Dorthea is not well. Cathrine wrote that they also have colds, and she had been to the doctor. Morbroder is at Wrang's and is well. Johanne is a big and capable girl, and she is fond of him. That helps a lot. Rasmus also must improve since he imagines himself a believer.

I don't know anything to write about. I think Karen Adsboel is writing a lot to you. She is certainly a clever seamstress, is now at home and going well. Oh, if I could only live to talk with you once more!

You didn't get the last Nyheder I sent.

We had a letter from Jesse at Christmas. We wish you a good New Year and affectionate greetings from your loving parents and sister Dorthea.

Find the time to write.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 25.03.1900.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good Paul,

I will let you know that we have received your letter and your picture and thank you for them. I cannot recognize you at all now. There is a great difference from the one we have when you went to Jesse when you were sixteen years old.

So you are well and studying hard at telegraphy. We too are well, thank God, for old people. We have had a hard winter, and we are still having it.

Cathrine and family were here two weeks ago. She promised she would write to you. They were all well. You have had Karen Adsboell's letter she wrote for your birthday. She is home. She is not sick, but she is not well enough to work. Your Morbroder is not well. I think it is good to be with Marie Wrang. Little Peter Schmidt, or Peder Boger as we called him, is dead and will be buried on Tuesday. Here many people are sick with influenza and pneumonia, but not many have died this winter. Old Lisbet is dead, and Thule is at Arbejdsgaarden.

I don't think I know any more now and close with many affectionate wishes from your loving parents and sister and hope that you will write us as soon as you have time.

Goodnight from your mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.07.1900.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good Paul,

We hear from Karen Adsboel that you have a job. We wish you good luck.

I must tell you some sad news. Your sister Cathrine died June 8th. It was very sad for her husband and especially for her children... they have no mother now. There are three: one 9 years, one 7 years, and one 5 years. You may be sure we will miss her very much. It was a great pleasure when they came a few times a year. We didn't go there often - it is too far.

Here there is now only poor Thea who is back. Se was home almost a year with a bad leg, but since May she had been in Vejstruproed. Your Farbroder Falle, whom you remember, has been a widower many years. He had a sickly daughter at home. She died in the autumn. Dorthea was able to help a little, but I didn't think it would last long. He is hard to get along with, and he is about 80 years old.

I have waited for a letter from you. You wrote in the last one that if you had not had any letters from us by June 10th you would write.

We are pretty well, God be praised. Your Morbroder is not very well.

Now I don't know anything more to write, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 06.12.1900.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear Son,

Since we got your welcome letter today I will at once write a few words or else it may not get done. Since I hope it comes to you by Christmas, I wish you a happy Christmas and a good New Year, that our Lord will give you health and all the good he wishes for you. May you have patience with your learning though it is long and hard. I think a great deal about how you will manage. It costs a lot of money. There is certainly a long learning time. Will it be all winter? You may be sure I pray for you, dear Paul.

We are pretty well, thank God. You can imagine how I miss Cathrine now at Christmas. They usually came home. I don't know how they are. He never writes.

Dorthea is now at Falle's. I have not heard from her since November. Rasmus Aagaard will have to get a housekeeper. I have not been there since Cathrine died. I cannot go so far and stay away from home. Your father cannot be alone. He is not exactly sick, but he is very old.

Greetings from your Morbroder and Wrang's. Morbroder is not very well.

You are certainly far from Jesse and Iver and Tante, so you will see none of them at Christmas. I have written to Jesse. I beg you to write when you can. It is a pity it costs so much.

Now best wishes and greetings from your loving parents and goodnight and goodbye from your mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.01.1901.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will write a few words to let you know we received your letter and are glad to hear that you are well and happy. May you keep your health and things go well for you.

It is a little early, but there is a chance to send you some socks with Christian Joergensen. He isn't going now at the time he intended when he was here at Christmas. Then he was expecting to go in March. I now have som grey yarn. I don't know whether you will like it. He prefers black. If you would write at once when you get this letter, I could get a pair of black done, and if there should be some you wish, he will take them with him. It is not so hard to mail from where he is.

Greetings from Rasmus and the children. They were here at Christmas. He is not getting along very well about finding a housekeeper. It is good for him to try a little. He can be sure it is not like a wife. He was indifferent enough when she was living. She took care of the whole outdoors. He drove the milk and did other things, too, but it could be but little income. Besides a girl will not take care of cattle. Neither is it easy for her to get along with the children. They are hard to please, and he takes their part. There could also be blame on the girl's side.

Kindest wishes from your loving parents and goodnight... from your loving mother, Maren Frimann.

I am sending you a little towards stamps. There is no one who knows it.

• FT-1901, 01.02.1901, Stenderup, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, matr. 2a.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.03.1901.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will let you know we received the cards you sent. We cannot read any English, but we can look.

Christian Joergensen is going to America next Wednesday, the 20th, and Jens Dal's son is going with him. Dal is going to Iowa. I have not talked with him. I do not know him. I am sending a little something with Christian which I hope he will send on to you. It is three pairs of socks, six handkerchiefs, two towels, and a scarf. I have put in the black socks and a pair of mittens. I only hope they fit and that you get them.

If you should be anxious for a little money, you must write and you will get it. When you have learned properly, you can get a place. It is hard work now, and you must think only of yourself and your future. You must not think a lot about us. We are well, as old people are, and well content. I hope I may live long enough to hear that you are successful. That I ask our Lord.

Our old house is being photographed. Christian has been up once, but his camera was not working right. Now that he has had it repaired, the sun will not shine. These days he is never home. Now he has promised to come on Monday to say goodbye so perhaps it will come to nothing. Had we had the money, we could have bought the house of Bogh's that Eilerson's live in. He wants 1600 kr. It is a lot. I think I will try betting on the lottery. It could just be lucky.

We have not heard from Thea and Hejls recently.

Affectionate greetings to you from your loving father and mother, M. Frimann.

Greet the others from us when you write to them.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 22.01.1902.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Lille gode Paul,

We thank you so heartily for your letter, good wishes, and gifts. You should easily not think of sending us anything in order to help yourself in the hard times. Thank God you are well. We are also pretty well. Your father has not much work, but we can take care of ourselves. Perhaps it will soon be better for you.

I don't think I know anything to write about. Old Karen Madsen is dead. I went there a lot at the end. That is why it has been a long time since I have written, but I hope that you will not pay me back. Fru Bogh has also been ill, and I have been there a bit, too. Christen Lindegaard is dead. Johannes Bramsen is home this winter from America. He came Christmas Eve with the post chaise from Kolding. They did not know it, and you may be sure there was joy. I thought - might I still be living the Christmas my Paul comes home. The others will certainly come no more.

Write us a little about what Iver is doing this winter and give him our regards, and tell us how Jesse is, and how you are. I send you greetings from Morbroder and Wrang's. They are well. Dorthea is in Hejls now. They have written to you. They promised to. Greet Jesse and his family from us.

We wish you well on your birthday and also wish you health and all the good things which our Lord may grant you. And now affectionate wishes to you from your loving parents, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 11.09.1902.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is time I get a few words written to you or you will think we are dead. We thank you for your letter and what you sent. We are well, your father and I. Dorthea has been sick all summer and still is not well.

We are having a late harvest here. The corn is not harvested yet. It is not ripe. We have had a cold and wet summer, as much as anyone can remember. The corn will not be in till Michaelmas Day. Now the days are becoming shorter.

I know nothing at all to write that would interest you. You may be sure we are glad to hear from you when you write. Tell us a bit about what you are doing. Are you going to work at night? You never go to Jesse's. Iowa is a long way from Nebraska. Lauritz Sandager has gone to America. Jes is married and lives in Kolding.

I don't remember whether I told you our old pastor died. He was 86 years old (Olsen), and Svend also recently died. He was 91. Pastor Diemer in Hejls has been called to be Stenderup pastor.

Greetings from Morbroder. He is well and Wrang's also. I have not been there in a whole year. I find it difficult to get about.

Greet Tante when you write. She wrote to me last. And you are greeted fondly by your sister, father, and mother.

Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 14.11.1902.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good Paul,

We thank you many times for your letter. It is the greatest pleasure we have to hear from you... also from Jesse and Iver... but that we do so seldom. I am so slow at it, but that you know better than I.

You are well then and doing well. You must watch out for yourself. You write that you eat twice a day. Thas is too little.

We are fairly well. Thea is also better. She will never be really well. She is home now. Winter is coming, which is not good, especially for old people. A hard winter is predicted here, but we have not had frost yet. That is good for the farmers as they are not yet finished in the fields, especially with their root crops.

You write that you will perhaps take a trip to Nebraska. Greet them many times from us and tell us a bit when you return.

I send you greetings from Fru Bogh. She says you are the best. You write so regularly to us. She says you write at least four pages. No, that I can't say. I am satisfied with less.

I don't remember whether I wrote that Hans Schmidt died in America, in New York, to be exact. It is said he could not be buried for he had no one from Kolding to pay for it, and seeing that, they wrote to his parents. We have also heard Thomas Frost is in a sanitarium in America... which state he is in I do not know. They have not heard from him for three years. One of Smeden's sons wrote it home.

Greetings from Morbroder and Vrang's and the best wishes to you from your sister, father, and mother. Maren Frimann.

When you write, could you write your address correctly.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 20.01.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Now I am really going to get a few words off to you. First we thank you for the Christmas present you sent us. It is too much. You don't earn high wages yet, and you have to pay board and room.

You were not in Nebraska at Christmas. I thought it would be hard for you, but you didn't seem to mind it. It is best to take care of your job.

We had a letter from Jesse at Christmas. They have a boy who was badly injured. He is not so little. He is fourteen.

We are having a hard winter now but no snow. At Christmas we had rain and storm. Christmas night there was terrible weather, which did a great deal of damage around the country. You must have read about it in the paper.

Your father is not well, though he is not entirely bedridden. Neither is your sister well. I am in the best shape, and that is a good thing for I can take care of them. I must keep well so we can all get over it.

Morbroder was sick all Christmas. Now he is better.

I don't know anything to tell that is worth writing. I will wish you many returns on your birthday and hope that you will keep your health and always be contented, and a good New Year and the best wishes from your loving father and mother and sister Dorthea.

Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 30.03.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good Paul,

I will write a few words to you. It has been long. I always think I have nothing to write about.

We thank you for your welcome letters and for being so regular at writing. It always pleases us to hear that you are well and happy.

We are pretty well, thank God. Your father can't do much. He is very old. April 12th he will be 78. There are many older who are in better health, but he has never been the strongest.

We understand from your letter that you think you are 28 years old, but when you reckon from 1876 you are certainly 27. The 24th of April it will be eleven years since you left Stenderup. The 7th of October, 1904, we can have a golden wedding. It makes me unhappy to think that we had a flock of children and now we will have only one here, that is only poor Dorthea, if she lives so long, and we must also say if we live so long.

Cathrine's husband and children we have not heard from in a long time. Perhaps they will come at Easter.

I send you greetings from Wrang's. Next winter Johanne will be confirmed. Your Morbroder has not been exactly well this winter. Now we are having summer weather. We have not had any snow this winter, nor much frost, but storm and rain.

I do not know any more to write.

Best wishes from your loving father and mother. Greetings from your sister.

Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.05.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is time to write a few words to you or you will think we have forgotten you. That would never be the case. I have no excuse. I have time enough, and I am certainly well enough to write. Your father and sister are also fairly well.

You wrote about your pictures, and thank you for the money. You should not have sent it. We had only the one picture. I am sending one that we had. There is a great diference between it and the last photograph.

Now you are having summer. It is still cold here, wind and rain every day so that the farmers can hardly sow the seed. We still need to have a fire.

I think I have nothing to tell you. I send you greetings from Rasmus and the children. They were here at Easter. They are well. He is not marrying again, though he has trouble keeping his housekeeper. That comes from the children. With them he can see no fault.

At your Morbroder's everyone is well now.

Our best wishes that you keep your health. Greet Jesse from us if you write and kindest greetings from your always loving father and mother.

Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.08.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is certainly time I got a few words written to you or you will believe we are no more. We thank you for your letter and greetings from the whole family. It makes us happy to hear you are all well.

It is too bad that Jesse's son is not well. It is not so good in Nebraska this year. There has been so much damage and storms so that there will not be much profit from the mill. Here it has been a hard summer. There is much damage in the fields in many places... not just around us... but it is a wet and cold summer. The corn is late ripening. They mostly are now letting the harvest lie.

It has rained almost every day for four weeks. Now the dog days soon will be over, so people think it will be better.

We are pretty well. Your father is not entirely bedridden, which is good. Your Morbroder and Wrang's are also well. You should just see Johanne now. She is as big as her mother. She will be confirmed next spring.

You write that you are learning to swim. Be careful you do not drown.

Greetings to Jesse and Iver if you write to them, and best wishes to you from your father and sister Thea and mother.

M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 07.10.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I thank you for being so regular in writing. It makes us happy to hear from you that you are well. You say that you are coming home. I am only afraid that they will take you for a soldier. It is not unusual. Peter Bogh says there is no danger. You can as an American citizen be free. Iver Wrang was not completely free. He was older than you. Now we will hope it goes well.

Your father is not well. He is not in bed, but he is weak. I hope that he will not suffer long.

Now we are having winter again. It is not so good, especially for old people. You have begun to have winter there, too. We are having rain and storm almost every day. The farmers can hardly sow their grain. They are not all finished yet, and the winter seed is not sown.

You must have moved a long way. I can see your letter costs a cent more. I must ask you to send an addressed envelope so that the letter will not be missent.

Today it is a year till we can have our golden wedding if we both live so long.

Greetings from Morbroder and Wrang's and best wishes from father and mother and sister, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 09.12.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear Paul,

It is certainly time I got a few words written to you. We got your last letter today. It is the fourth since I wrote to you. You are a good boy to write (as you say), and I am grateful to you for it. It is good that you are well... how you toil... the time though must be a little long since you go so far to ice skate. It is winter here too, but it is unsettled. I don't think there has been any skating. When it freezes one day, it rains the next.

We are pretty well, except for your father. He is not in bed, but we prefer to be near the fire. We had to have a new pipe... the old one could not last any longer. It fell twice last winter.

We wish you a happy Christmas and a good New Year, but you must not keep Christmas by ice skating, especially when you go so far. I also hope you will have a good position. If you are going to move, you must remember to write at once when you have moved.

Greetings from Morbroder and Wrang's. They are well. Johanne is preparing for confirmation this winter. She is bigger than her mother. In case you could think a bit and send something to her confirmation, it would be very welcome.

I know no more now. Goodnight, lille Paul, and the kindest wishes from your loving fatjer and mother, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 30.12.1903.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

We thank you many times for the Christmas gifts which you sent. We got the money exchanged in Kolding and got 55 kr. 40. Thomas Winter got it converted for us. We are very grateful. We can never send you any Christmas gifts. I could knit you some socks for when you come if you will write what colour you would like. I have a pair of black finger mittens ready, but they do not help you in winter when they are lying at home.

We are not having a severe winter here yet. I don't know anything to write about. We are well, except for Father. He is noticeably feeble. Dorthea says it is only old age infirmity.

Thomas Frost has died in a mental institution in Sekage (Chicago?). He had been there several years.

Now we wish you a happy New Year and may you keep your health, and if you move, may you get a good place.

Affectionate greetings from your loving father and mother, Maren Frimann.

Greetings from your sister.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.01.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good son,

We thank you many times for your letters. You are so good to write. You think that we are indifferent and ungrateful, but that we are not. I thank you early and late in my thoughts, for you may believe it makes us happy to hear from you.

I thank you for the Christmas gift, and the sewing needles and almanac, and God grant you may keep your health and get work.

I am not well now, but I will be again.

I have been a long time sending these Nyheder. There are some from Wrang. Greet Jesse from us and Iver. Him we will never hear from while I live.

Affectionate greetings to you from your loving parents, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 08.02.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I send with these lines affectionate wishes and congratulations from your father and me on the occasion of your birthday, that you may keep health and good contentment and that God will preserve you from all trouble. It is so dangerous around trains.

You will get no letter on your birthday, but rather late, as always. It is not because I have forgotten, but your father has been ill lately; therefore I waited to write. Now he is better again. He is not in bed all the time, but he is failing a great deal. It is now two years since he began to be in poor health. It would be good if he should not suffer long. Thank God that I am well enough to take care of him. If only I may be at the end. Thea is here, but she is not able to do much. Now she is at Vejstrup at her cousin's, but she will not be there long.

Greetings from Morbroder. He is well, and he is now a cattleman. They have 2 cows, 3 calves, no pigs, but 2 horses. It is not a large operation.

Best wishes from your always loving father and mother, M. Frimann.

Greetings to Jesse's family if you write to them.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 13.04.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will let you know that the gift you sent came in good order. I think it was very suitable. They were pleased with it. They all thought it was beautiful. Morbroder said so when he was here last night for your father's birthday. Rasmus Wrang was here and said it was very nice that you remembered them. He asked me to send his compliments to you and to thank you. Johanna will write herself. They had visitors every day to offer congratulations. There were many on Confirmation Day, last Sunday. All Wrang's family, and there are many. They were from both Haderslev, Jylland, and Fyn. They too gave many gifts. Hans Wrang gave her a gold watch. I have not seen anything of it yet. We should have been there but your father now can go nowhere. Your sister too has been in bed with a bad leg lately so I must be at home. But thank God I am pretty well so that I can take care of them.

I know nothing now to write about. We have not had any summer yet, only rain and storm. Last Wednesday the roof nearly flew off our old house.

Greet Jesse from us if you write him. It is disgraceful that I never get anything written to them. Writing is such a burden for me.

Affectionate greetings to you from your always loving father and mother and from sister, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 19.07.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Good little Paul,

It is about time I got a few words written to you so you can see we are alive. You have written three letters without having one from me. I am grateful for you are so good to us, and it pleases us to hear that you are fine and getting along well.

Your father is not well. He is not in bed all the time, but he is in pain all the same. I am well, and it is a good thing that I can take care of him.

It is summer now, but not so much warm as dry. We have not had rain in a long time so the grain is very short. The hay is now gathered in. There are many home from America now.

We heard that the steamer Norge was wrecked with so many people who drowned. It is said 600 emigrants. It was sad.

I don't know anything to write about. When you write, let me know whether Wrang's have written to you. Give Jesse's family our regards when you write.

Best wishes from father and mother and sister Thea, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 24.08.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear good Paul,

Since I see from your letter that we got today that you did not get my last letter, which I believe was sent the 17th of July, I am at once writing a few words to you. I am sorry that you are not well, but I cannot help you. That will not be till you take a vacation to Denmark next summer, nor can that be when you are not well and if you want to keep your job... so goes it if you travel.

We are as usual. Your father is not well. He is not completely bedridden, but he cannot do anything. Thank God I am well and I can help him. Now we are going on with the Golding Wedding. I am tired of it, but will think of something in case your father lives so long. It would be best for him that he did not. His condition has not changed much all summer.

The harvest is in full swing now. We have had a dry summer so there is only a little grain in some places.

Write soon about how you are and how it is in your new place. Let me know if you have had letters from Wrang's.

Affectionate greetings from father and mother, M. Frimann.

And best wishes from sister Thea.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 08.09.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will let you know we have received your welcome letter and thank you many times for the gift. It is not so good for us now for we have your sister to care for. She cannot earn anything, and we must have her at home. What will happen to her if she remains after us?

You write that you do not know whether you will come home. We are wondering now whether, if you do not come in the fall, you will come at another time. You will lose a great deal by it. We will be happy if only you keep your health and succeed. That is our greatest wish for you.

Your father is very ill, but he has been so for a long time. If only he does not suffer too long. I am well, thank God, or it would be really hard for us.

I am sorry that Wrang's could not write a few words to you.

Now best wishes. May all go well with you, and greetings from your loving parents and sister, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.11.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I must now write to you for I am anxious to hear from you. I think it is a whole eternity since we heard from you. Your letter of October 6th I really didn't deserve since I have not written you since the wedding. Fru Bogh wrote to you, she said, and gave you an account of the whole thing, which I hope you have received. Didn't you get the letter? You must let me know so that I can tell you about it. I wrote to Jesse and Iver.

We got through it. It went better than I had expected. However, I thought your father should have stayed indoors. Even when he is in pain, he does not stay in bed the whole time. I am sorry you are ill. You are having a hard winter. We have not had winter yet, and if we get frost before we get rain, there will be a big water shortage for people who have many animals.

I close in hope of soon hearing from you and many thanks for the gift you sent us.

Affectionate greetings from father and mother and sister Thea, Maren Frimann.

Dear Paul,

We got your welcome letter before that one was sent so I will write a few words and thank you for the letter and many thanks for the gift you sent. You should not have sent it, for the first is all too much. Now we are well helped for a long time. Jesse and Iver sent nearly 80 kr., and you did the same, and we have something left over from the wedding. We received 135 kr. but we paid out altogether a good 70 kr. Fru Bogh helped us with the preparations. It was partly at Bogh's place for we had too little room, but it was all very nice and ceremonious. We had the house a little spruced up outside and inside. They thought it was too simple, that it should have been held in the town, but your father was not able. He could go nowhere.

Fru Bogh was pleased with the letter you wrote to her. She came and read it to me, and I thank God you are well. You must tend to your work before you write. I do not know why I was so anxious about hearing from you.

I hope Jesse and Iver got the letters I wrote to them about the weddding. I wrote also to Tante Marie.

Now goodnight and affectionate greetings from you mother.

Greet them if you write.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 20.01.1905.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is certainly time I get a few words written to you. First, I thank you for the wonderful Christmas gift you sent. It is too much. Also for the picture (portrait of Paul) and the card. We don't understand that. You write that it is a good likeness. I don't think I will recognize you when you come. You wrote that you got many Christmas presents. But I think you got none from your mother that you could be pleased with.

Now we have had some frost and snow, but you are having freezing weather.

Your father is quite ill. He is in bed all the time now. The doctor says he can easily lie there for some time. He suffers a great deal and is often impatient. It is difficult enough for me, but I am well, thank God.

Our compliments to Jacob Wind and give him congratulations on his marriage from his old aunt in Denmark whom he has never seen. When this letter reaches you, will you write to him.

We wish you a good and happy New Year and wish you good fortune on your birthday. I am getting nothing written for it. Greet Jesse if you write them. We have not heard anything from them. Petrea writes when she has time.

Now affectionate greetings from father and mother, Maren Frimann, and sister Thea.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 04.03.1905.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will let you know we received your letter and the money, for which we are very grateful to you. You are so good. You must not send more.

You may be sure that we are glad that you are coming home. I think it will cost you a lot. You must work a long time for it, but you can be sure that I will be glad to talk with you. Our Lord will grant that you have a safe journey and that I may live to see you. I am now well, but a change can occur quickly. Your father is not at all well. He has been in bed since Christmas, and he suffers a great deal. A few days ago he had a little operation. It would have been bigger, but then he would have had to go to the hospital, and he could not stand that. He was too weak. He has had some relief. He can now sleep a little. He tells the doctor that he will live till you come. On his last birthday I thought he did not have long, and now it is soon his birthday again.

Fru Bogh is glad that you are coming. You can stay there at night, and in the daytime we can have you. Yes, she is clever and good with your father. She got the last pictures you sent and was glad to have them. Bogh has the books you sent. I don't know whether he can read English, but he would anyway look at them. I don't know whether you could think of some little thing for Fru Bogh... just a little special and something from America.

I pray that you may remain well. Greetings to Jesse when you write. I have not written them. It has been hard for me lately. Dorthea too has been in bed, but now she is a little better.

Now affectionate greetings from your parents and sister. We will hear from you before you start out.

Goodnight, little Paul.

Your mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 08.04.1905.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Dear Good Paul,

I will just write a few words and let you know we have received your letter with pleasure and thank you many times for the gift and congratulations and for the flower seeds. I would share them with Fru Bogh, but she said to let me sow them all and she can get some plants if they will grow here. She is glad you are coming, and when you come she says we will have both house room and heart room.

Your father is not well. He is so tired of lying in bed all the time, and he suffers a great deal. The doctor was here today. There is nothing to do except await our Lord's time. I am well, thank God. I cannot write down on paper how glad I am that you are coming, and I pray that our Lord will grant you a good journey. Dorthea is pretty well now. She will certainly count the days when May begins. I say she must not begin to expect you before the 16th.

Now loving wishes and the best hope that we soon may see one another, from your parents and sister, M. Frimann.

Picture dated June 14th to 20th 1905 of R. M. S. Caronia from Cunard Line.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 27.09.1905.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will just write a few words and thank you for your kindness and for the many letters. You may be sure I am glad that I can follow you on all your travels. It helps to stand the loss, and you have gone so easily over your journey so far. The first nights and days were so long for me.

I am well, thank God. Emma comes often to spend some time. She is a nice girl. She thought we should write a few words to you. She has written a letter... if you got it. Here there is nothing new since you left. A lot of Americans have come home. Bramsen's son, wife, and son, Rasmus Juhl's daughter and husband and their daughter. I think Emma will tell you all about that. I will write later on.

Goodbye, lille Paul.

Affectionate greetings from your sister and mother, M. Frimann.

A picture dated Sept. 1905 of SS Hellig Olav (Koebenhavn-New York).

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 26.10.1905.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

You must not believe I am angry with you because you write so often. I am very grateful to you for spending so much money for my sake. You may be sure I pray for you. You must watch your health. I was right. When the letter came, you were not so happy, but now things are going better. It was also a long time since you had worked. It is now a good five weeks since you left here. That is a long time, and Emma and I say it is like five years.

Surely no one misses you so much as Emma and I. She comes often and is always glad when I have had a letter. She sees them... not all. She worried a lot before she got a letter. She wrote one addressed to Chapman and one to Sikeston. I wrote one to Sikeston with my address on the back. Emma says, "If I had enough money I would go to America". She can sell her cycle and her sewing machine, but it would bring so little. Sometimes I too think it would be nice to go, but it can never come to anything. Emma's brother Christian says you are coming back in four years. Now he wants to go to America.

Everything is as usual, and we are well and have a fire as it is beginning to be winter.

Bogh and Frue are in Koebenhavn this week. They are having a good time while they can.

When you write, let me know whether you got any of the letters.

Now affectionate greetings from your sister and mother, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 30.11.1905.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will let you know that I have received your letter of the 11th and thank you many times for the money. You are too good. I have now had 50 kr. from you. I am ashamed to take so much money from you in so short a time. You have worked hard for it. It is worse for you now that you are not well. It worries me. Can you imagine what would become of me if I should outlive you? The last time was so sad for me. I have been prepared to go to America if it should be, although I know well I will never go. Dear Paul, you must seek a remedy. You need a good housekeeper to cook for you. That you could easily get. You wrote once that you got no oatmeal porridge in the morning. Can you not get a little cooker and cook for yourself and get some potatoes? It would be good for you. You should have milk foods or milk to drink. You wrote you slept close by the stove, but you have no bed yet. You must see about getting yourself a bed. You write most of the night. I have received my share of the letters. I counted them today.

We have received the pictures, and we are glad to have them. In Decorah Posten there is much reading, but some we have seen in the paper long before. There are a few stories, which I like most, but I don't think you should send it any longer. It also costs to send it.

Thea and I are pretty well and lack nothing. I bought pork for 20 kr. and some coal. I was afraid wood goes too fast. It is lonesome now. The only one who comes to kill a little time is Emma, and I am glad for her visits. Today Maria Wrang was here, the first time since October 7th. That is not very often, nor does your Morbroder come. They had a letter from you. You are getting some letters at Christmas. Today Sine Krog got your address. Fru Bogh is writing. I send you greetings from Wrang's, Knudsen's, Ole Adsboel's.

The rest of the letter is missing.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

When you were home we talked about the situation if Dorthea should survive me. If I die first, there may not be anything to divide... but I cannot now give it to her without your permission. Could you write to Jesse about writing me or rather giving me an authorization which Iver and you would sign that it was hers after my death. I think it is too bad when it becomes the affair of the authorities.

Now you can see what you think.

Farvel, lille Paul.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 16.01.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I am happy to hear you had a pleasant Christmas and received many presents. That you must reciprocate, but it is nice to have good friends. We also had a good Christmas. Thank you for all the almanacs and pictures. I gave Rasmus Juhl one and Anna Holst. Then I had one, and I gave it to Johan Lange from you. I send you his compliments and say I thought he delivered so much mail to us he had one coming. Anne Marie Adsboel was pleased with the almanac, and I am to thank you. Perhaps Karen has written. Wrang got theirs. I haven't talked with them... I sent it with Morbroder. I had chosen the one with the children before I saw that it was for me. The one left Rasmus Aagaard's children got. They were here last Sunday. I had expected them all through Christmas. Rasmus has had a bad hand for a long time, but it was better. They have no housekeeper this winter.

Peter is preparing for confirmation but is not going to school. He was fourteen last summer. You don't know what to send him? I hardly know whether you could send him the money for a pair of shoes. I thought I would give him some money to help get him a watch. I have the money. Jess sent me 50 kr. but I will nevertheless economize. I didn't believe it when I received a letter from them. It came January 3rd.

I don't know about the house taken by Valborg. You must send no money. Painter Skov will see to having it taken. I don't want to offend her since she offered to.

Berg's send compliments and thanks for the Christmas card. Emma also brought me greetings a few days ago. Perhaps she has written herself. In case you write to her, Maria Jensen sends good wishes to her. I got her letter and thank her.

Now you don't have so much work you will feel better... also a good bed to sleep in.

Now I know no more this time. Affectionate greetings from your sister and mother, Maren Frimann.

Goodnight, lille Paul.



• FT-1906, 01.02.1906, Stenderup, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, matr. 2a. A housewife and a widow. Dortea Marie, her daughter, is at home.

The picture was taken by painter Skov.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.02.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have your letter today of the 30th, and I am glad to see that you are well. Dorthea is not well and has been in bed lately. It is a good thing that I can take care of her.

I have nothing much to write about. You didn't say what you thought about Peter Aagaard. I should also tell you that you should remember to put "per Kolding" on your letters. The last two letters had been in Horsens, according to the stamp.

You sent an almanac to Wrang's. One came... they didn't know from whom but decided it must be you... they had got one of those you sent to me. Didn't you get Fru Bogh's letter? We were talking about it today.

Gode Paul, will you make me a present of a pen like yours. It must be nice to have. I could do without the Decorah Posten. It costs quite a bit of money. I thought you could send one wrapped in some paper.

We are having the house photographed in the spring, but that your aunt was born in has been gone since I was six years old. It lay behind Brodersensgaard (Broedregaard?).

I will send a picture of our house which Valborg took, but you must burn it right away. It is not even the whole house.

With affectionate greetings and wishes that you may be well from your sister and mother, M. Frimann.

Goodnight, lille Paul.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.03.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will now write a few words to you. Today I received your letter of the 4th, and I am very grateful to you. You write so regularly, and it pleases me to hear you are well content and healthy. We are pretty well, but your sister has been in bed for three weeks and has had the doctor many times. Now she is beginning to be better. I am so glad she didn't go to the infirmary.

I hope you got Fru Bogh's letter. She also sent some pictures. She has been good to us at this time. Bogh's have promised that I should get wood. They have not been able to drive in their woods all winter. They go over Hans Lausen's field, and they cannot drive there. We have had a lot of rain and storm, and one day frost - then rain. Last night it froze, tonight it is snowing, so perhaps the roads will be better.

I had a letter from Petrea, Jesse's wife, and was very happy about that. Won't you greet them when you write. I will soon write them. Old Uncle Wind is better. Remember us to them. I send you good wishes from Hans Schmidt's mother. She was sick a long time this winter. Greetings also from Miss Valborg. I have not heard from Rasmus Aagaard. The time for confirmation is Palm Sunday or the Sunday after Easter. I hope to go to it. Your Morbroder will certainly get Rasmus Wrang's conveyance and drive. Anna Maria Oles will be with Thea if she can't go.

Now I don't know any more.

Affectionate greetings from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 03.04.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I got your letter today. Yes, it is really such a great joy to think that you have such kindness for your mother. I think often you give too much money to me. I thank you for the money you sent. I have sent it to Hejls. I sent them 20 kr. and wrote that it was 15 kr. from Uncle Paul and 5 kr. from Bedstemoder. So he can really get a watch. They can take care of that.

I understand from your letter that you are travelling further away.

I wrote to you about a pen. It was a strange request. You must understand it was not for me. I have always thought of giving Dr. Henmag a little remembrance of your father. I cannot think that there is anything odd about it. He was good and patient with him. I can still so clearly see how he stayed by him. I think that such a pen is not unusual. You think perhaps it is a foolish idea I have.

Now we are all better, thank God, than when I wrote last. I am well except for rheumatism. I have trouble getting my clothes on. Morbroder has been sick and since last Sunday has been in bed. I have not heard from him since.

We have had fair weather the last days. All March we had storms and rain and snow.

Now the kindest wishes to you from sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.



• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 25.04.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is certainly time I got a few words written to you. I have had several letters. I got one yesterday, and I am glad to hear that you are well and getting along well in your work. We also are pretty well now.

We were in Hejls last Sunday. Morbroder drove. It was a nice trip. They were all well. Peter got himself a watch. He was certainly happy. He had also got several things from his father's family. We gave him our 20 kr., and Morbroder gave 2 kr. I send you their compliments and thank you many times from them. They all think it was so kind of you to remember him. They have had no housekeeper this winter. Now they will get one in May.

We got the pictures and thank you for them.

I send you compliments from Bogh's. Fru Bogh thinks it was so nice that you sent them a card at Easter. Also greetings from Emma. She was here last night. She had written three weeks ago, and two weeks ago she sent a picture taken of the church interior. It was decorated for the king. There was a funeral oration. It must be nice. I have not seen it. You will get the picture one of these days.

Knudsen's little daughter is very sick, and she may not live. They are soon moving to the new midwife residence.

Greetings from Morbroder and the best wishes from your sister and grateful mother, Maren Frimann.

Greet the family when you write to them.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 16.05.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I received your letter of the 29th and thank you many times for the enclosed. It is too much. You had great expenses last winter. The best is to hear you are well and happy. You are not moving this summer.

We are fairly well and getting along fine. Here the long winter is over and we are having summer, which can also be tiresome enough, but this looks like a good summer. Everything is so good in the fields, and the farms are now ready.

I cannot find anything to write you about today, only a few words. Knudsen's have moved to their new place. Little Atallie did not die. I was there yesterday. It was Fruen's birthday. I miss them.

Greet the family when you write them. I will try to have little more to write about next time.

Now the best wishes to you from your sister and always loving and grateful mother, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 02.06.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I see from your letter of May 13th that you are anxious about getting the house photographed. I have talked many times with Skov. He has promised now immediately after Whitsun to take it. He has been so busy, and also it has rained for the last three weeks. It is raining today so that the water is running like a brook past the house. It is so cold that we have a fire going. It is like North Dakota here. I have rheumatism badly, and I feel the cold. However, we are pretty well. The month of May is now past, and it is Whitsuntide... so goes the time.

We are expecting them from Hejls, but they have not come for Rasmus has been sick.

There is nothing new here. Anna Holst has been sick a long time.

You must now have patience.

Kindest greetings from your sister and mother, M. Frimann.

Here is a flower from your sister.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 19.06.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have your last letter, which you wrote Pentecost Sunday. It is the greatest joy to hear that you are happy. You may be sure I am grateful to you. It costs a lot... so many letters, so much money in addition, and the pictures. Now we have had the house photographed. We will get the pictures this week.

We have our wood at home now. I am glad to have plenty of wood for winter. I gave Bogh's 20 kr. and Wrang 10. We have not had it cut. Ole has promised to, but he has been so busy. Dorthea chops and saws every day, but she must stay in bed one day in between. I am well now except for rheumatism. I would be glad to be able to dress and undress myself. It is mostly in the left arm. I visited the doctor a month ago, but it has not helped much. You remember the doctor. Someday perhaps you will send something to him.

The Bogh's are on trips most of the time. He has got himself a cutter. They are enjoying life while they can. Fru Knudsen is living across from Johan Lange's, a nice house.

On Sunday Rasmus is coming. We are commemorating your homecoming last year. It is now the anniversary.

Greetings from Wrang's. I was there today. It was Maria's birthday. Your Morbroder is well. Anna Holst is better. I think Peter has written you.

Now the most affectionate greetings from your sister and your always loving and grateful mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 04.07.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I hope you received the house picture. Thea and I will come later. I don't think you will be satisfied with the house. It could not be otherwise for Sandager's had put the fence full of hop stakes in front of the house. He stood by the door that goes into Sandager's. It was along the side so the whole house is not included. We can see nothing this summer but hop stakes.

I shall see about getting you some post cards. Thea and I were in Kolding the other day. Had I known, I could have got them then.

We are well. I have had my wood sawed, and we are all right till next year if I live so long.

Now it is warm and dry. We need rain.

I have got a stone for Father's grave. It is not very big.

Affectionate wishes from your sister and mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 25.07.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Today I got your welcome letter of the 7th and thank you many times for the enclosed. It is too much. I hope that when you get this letter you have had the one I sent the 26th, the pictures, our picture, and the post cards. I sent our picture to Jesse and Iver, and Tante also gets one.

There came the other day two nice packages of flower seeds which will be pretty flowers. Thea was pleased with them.

We are well. Thea has had a little vacation and has been in Hejls a few days. They asked to be remembered to you when we wrote.

I was worried that last year you chopped too much of our currants, but we are getting currants enough. We are now picking them, and we have to keep working to get our bushes picked. We are having someone help us.

You write that I should get myself a typewriter. I can help myself enough.

I send you greetings from Rasmus Juhl's wife. You can send her one... she has trouble with writing.

Affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 25.07.1906-21.08.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

(A correct date is missing, - only "26th").

Gode Paul,

I got your letter today and the one with money yesterday. It has been a long time on the way.

I am glad that you have the pictures and they were not broken. I was sorry that you didn't get the whole house. Skov said he could not get it. Sandager's have set the whole fence full of hop stakes... also in back we see nothing else from morning till night. It is inside Bogh's fence... stakes and strings... as soon as they are gone I will get him to take another.

In case the picture of Thea and me is broken, you can get another. I have been so confused about this. Thea keeps saying that I have sent an old one that was lying in the drawer... for we have one more than we should.

Now goodbye and keep well.

Your loving mother, Maren Frimann.

I hope you will get the post cards now.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.08.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will get a few words written to you. It is now the anniversary of when you left Stenderup. I did not sleep much that night. This year it was even less. I have been sick a few days and now there is breaking out. The doctor called it shingles (hellfire). It is very painful. There are many old people who get it. It is not dangerous. I am better now. We poor people have to suffer in many ways.

It is hard for such a young man I think to have an operation. It must be bad, too... in the face.

Greet Tante when you write. Also from Morbroder. She got the little picture I sent. I sent also one to Jesse and Iver. I hope they got them.

We had it so dry a long time. Now the farmers have all their grain harvested. It is raining every day and they cannot get it in stacks.

Now affectionate wishes from your sister and loving mother.

M. Frimann.

24th. Thea is ill.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 05.09.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I will let you know that I am pretty well again. I was very sick. Thea was sick too. She was down first so we were able to help each other, and Fru Bogh also helped us.

I have your letter of the 19th, and I thank you for it. I have a couple of pictures for you that I will send soon. One is of Vrang's house and mill and one of Peter Holst's house. I wished to get a few more and visited the painter. He had none at the time, but perhaps he has some now. I have not been in town the last three weeks. I will go one of these days. He has promised to take the house again.

You have probably forgotten my doctor. If it is not convenient for you, don't think any more about it.

Greetings from Sine Krog. I will write again soon. Now best wishes to you from your sister and affectionate mother, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 27.09.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have your letter of the 9th. Thank you many times. You must not send so much money. I worry about you because you are not well, and I think a lot about where you are going. That doesn't help you any. I am pretty well, not in bed anyway. Your sister has a bad cold. We have had to have a fire.

Rasmus Juhl is dead. He died two weeks ago. He went so quickly... it was a short illness. He became sick at home at six in the afternoon. At eight the same day he died.

Bogh's have had a steam threshing machine. In two weeks he has all his grain threshed. He is selling corn, straw, and hay. He has five milk cows. It is a little herd.

Will Jesse not soon have his big girl married? I never hear from them now. Where is Charles who was living with you?

Gode Paul, now best wishes and affectionate greetings to you from your sister and always loving mother. God grant you get a good job and keep your health.

Maren Frimann.

I certainly hope you got the pictures. It is two weeks since I sent them. When you move, will you not send forward post? I won't write to you till I can send it to the new place.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.10.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

You may be sure I was happy with your letter and to hear you are well and glad you have an assistant. You can spare yourself a bit now you have Charles. He is big and strong and you know each other. It is good to have one at your place that you can trust.

As for us, things are as usual. We are pretty well. To tell the truth, I cannot say well, but we must put up with it. Now a long cold winter is coming. It is certainly not so good to think about.

If Bethse comes out to you, ask her if they got my and Thea's pictures. I have not heard anything from them.

What do you think about what I wrote to you in my last letter? Could it not be arranged like that... you could deal with it... but perhaps Jesse would not consider anything like that. I think it is annoying that if I die before Thea, the authorities should have to take charge. You do now what you can. You can explain better to Jesse than I can.

Yes, good Paul, you are good to me. There is certainly no one who has so good a son and one who is so thoughtful of his old mother to write every Sunday, besides what you give me. The nurse says so, too. She has come here often. I send her regards. I never see Emma. I ask her about Emma that we don't see her. They often came together last winter. Herman will soon be married.

Now affectionate wishes from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 07.11.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have received with pleasure your letter of October 14th, and we thank you for the enclosed. It is much too much. You must not send so much. Iver sent USD 6.00. Now we are well off for a long time. Now I am well except for rheumatism. That I will never get rid of. Most people are afflicted by it, but they can live all the same.

I am sorry I am not getting the house photographed this fall. Painter Skov is sick. Perhaps I will be lucky enough to have him come in the spring. The one who took Vrang's Mill was from Fredericia. P. Holst has promised to tell me if he comes.

I send you greetings from Rasmus Aagaard. They were here last Sunday. They are all well and getting along fine. They have no housekeeper this winter and have to help themselves.

We have had a mild winter so far, only a little rain. It is very dry. Our well is so dry. It has never been so dry as long as I have been here.

Greet Wind's from us when you write, also from Morbroder. He is well. And best wishes and greetings to you from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 28.11.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 28.11.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

You may be sure I am pleased with the paper and the pen. I have not had time to deliver the pen.

About the paper, I thought I should let Teacher Berg see it for safety's sake. He believed it was not valid and thought I should take it to Kolding to the authorities. I went there the other day. They said at once that it was not valid and prepared me another that I could send if you wanted to sign it. It was perhaps more correct to send it to Jesse, but you can excuse me. I think my letters go safest to you. You will manage it for me, good Paul... I am always imposing on you.

I have written to Iver and thanked him for the money. I hope he got the letter. I have had a letter from Tante and Onkel Wind today. She sent two dollars. When you write to them, will you let them know that I got it.

I am very pleased with the pen. I do not know how it is used, but I think the doctor will understand. He will be pleased too. Perhaps I have foolish ideas, but now that I have it, I wish he came oftener so that I could give it to him.

We are pretty well. I had a slight cold the day I was in Kolding, but it has improved.

It will soon be Christmas. God knows how many we shall live through. Mathaeus Smed died two weeks ago. He was no old man nor young, but worn out by work.

We have not had frost and snow yet, but wind and rain.

To close we wish you a happy Christmas and New Year and health and contentment in the new year, and we send loving greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

You are forgetting to put Ved Kolding on my address.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 18.12.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

We thank you for the letter of the 29th and the pretty cards which you sent us and for your attentiveness towards the old and the young. There are certainly not many who are so considerate. The nurse is especially pleased. She had not expected it. Perhaps she is writing herself.

Herman Schmidt was married last Friday.

I am very grateful to you for the pen which you sent. The doctor has it now. He is very pleased with it. He said it was kind of you, and it was a fine remembrance. There is no one who knows but the nurse. It pleased her as much as if she herself had got it. I have now given her a little something.

Mathias Joergensen died the other day, and the day before yesterday old Fru Toegesen died. I don't go near Stenderup any more.

I hope you got my last letter of November 30th.

Thea and I are well. We wish you a happy New Year and hope that you will keep healthy. Affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

Langhoff's eldest daughter is engaged to Emil Straarup.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 04.01.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

First we wish you a happy and good and contented New Year and thank you very much for the gift and many pretty cards. We had a good Jul though your sister was sick during Christmas, but she is better now. We haven't been outside the door, but I am glad we have such good food. We did need fuel, but we are getting more, and so we are pretty well off. Rasmus Aagaard was here the day after Christmas and well satisfied. He has three healthy children. Peder is a bigh boy now. He drives the milk so Rasmus is mostly at home. The girls do not go to school every day, so they have no housekeeper. It is going very well.

I also had a letter from Jesse. He sent a nice present. I have not got it yet for the instructions indicated Koebenhavn. It came the 28th after Christmas. It was Friday, and we had snow storm for a few days, and there was no one at Kolding. Yesterday, the 3rd, there was snow, so it will come in a few days, Thomas Winter thinks. Also with it an invitation to their silver wedding on June 2. I will try to think what I could get to send them. It is not so easy for me. I do not understand such things. It is so long till the money comes.

I also got Betse's picture with the name Maren Elisabeth Frimann, Glaedelig Nytaar. I had a letter and a card from Iver, so you may be sure I am glad you all remember me.

Greetings from Morbroder. You can bet he had a big birthday the 28th. They had a flag out from morning till evening. He was 70 years old. We were not there for Thea was sick, and it was also snowing.

I don't know any more now I can write you as you were sent a card.

Best wishes from your sister and always loving mother, M. Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 26.01.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Now I must see to writing a little to you. I have now had several letters from you this year and am very grateful to you. I think often you spend too much money for stamps. I am glad, however, and thank you for the gift. I believe I have written more than 76 letters in the 16 years you have been in America, but you have certainly written many more.

There is trouble with unemployment in Washington. I hope you will be well so things will be better again. I am pretty well now. Thea also. We are quite well off really. We can stay mostly near the fire, and we have good fuel. Should you come home again, you shall be free to carry in the woodpile. It may be hard... you probably remember it still. We have had a lot of frost and some snow.

I send you greetings from Anna Maria Ole's. They will all come themselves when it is Leap Year.

Greetings from Morbroder and R. Aagaard. The children were here today. He was not with them. His only cow was sick at Christmas, and they did not come. Anna will be confirmed in the spring. She is managing it for herself at home, does not go to school, only to confirmation preparation twice a week at the pastor's.

We congratulate you on your birthday and hope that you will keep your health.

Affectionate greetings from sister and your loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 29.01.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is time I got a few words written to you. I have now had several letters from you. I am grateful to you, you are so good. We are well and getting along all right. We have had winter for some time, but not much snow.

Jesse will have a silver wedding in the summer. I would like to send something they could have as a keepsake. If only I knew what it could be and get it sent. Tell me what you think if I got two silver tablespoons. Do you not think I could have them stamped at the post office so they could go all right? I am not having my name put on since Father is gone, but I have written theirs.

Next month Maria Jensen is going to America over to Jens Winter. She had so many sweethearts in Kjoebenhavn that she might leave from there. I don't know where Jens Winter is. Perhaps you do. His sister is going along.

Greetings from the nurse. She wants to write to you. She would have written before but could not. She has been at the rectory night and day since before Christmas. The minister's wife has been so sick and still is. Many have been sick here. Berg's daughter has been at home sick since Christmas. Fru Bogh has also been ill. There are many dead... they are mostly old ones who can be dispensed with.

I do not know who presented you with a gold watch.

Now I do not know any more to write. We wish you happiness on your birthday. May you keep your health. Affectionate greetings from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 19.02.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

You may be sure I was glad yesterday to get your welcome letter of January 20th and two post cards, and today a letter of February 3rd. I have worried both day and night. We cannot at all imagine how things are there.

It is hard here for many, but we are all right. There is hard frost but not much snow here. I don't think there has been much snow any place in Denmark, but we have had such gales that I am afraid the old house will fall down.

We are well. Has there been much snow in Nebraska? I have written to them... I hope they got my letters. I also wrote to you January 29th and hope you got it.

There are many sick here now, but no one has died in February.

Give my wishes to Jes and Iver and Tante when you write.

In the morning we will celebrate your birthday and congratulate you and hope you have chocolate.

I don't know any more to write. P. Holst is writing soon. He will tell you a lot. His sister is still not well and will not be again. I am sorry for her father and mother.

Now best wishes to you from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 25.03.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

We have received your letter of March 8th, and we are glad to hear that you are well. The salary is not so much as you got before. That will come, and the working hours are shorter.

You wrote that a young lady is going to visit me. She will be welcome, and for your sake I will do what I can for her. That is not much. I have not had the house put well in order. You know that. There is nothing I can change. The bedrooms are not such as a lady from a fine home is used to, and I cannot prepare them properly. Where shall I take her? Shall I go to Vrang's? Bogh's are not so suitable. I don't know how things are going over there. On Wednesday he is holding an auction of his property. It looks as if it will soon be over. If I do not get something done with the outside of the house, it is also all over with me. I cannot remain as it is. I would not like to move, nor can I afford to pay for it myself. You must not write anything about it to them.

You wanted to send money to Anna. It is almost too much. I do not know how I can buy anything, but she could have money. I don't know whether I am going. The confirmation is Palm Sunday. I would rather be home. The nurse has now gone or she would help me. Fru Knudsen is not one to rely on so I have no one. I could move to Hejls, but I would not like that. There will be a solution.

Best wishes and greetings from your sister and mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 18.04.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Now it is a long time since I have written to you, but thank God I have heard so often from you that you are well. That you write... I know nothing else. I think that is true, though I think you had trouble in the winter. I can only imagine it. I think often at night I see you. You write that perhaps you will buy land. I think that perhaps that is not best for you, but I really don't understand anything and have become so old, you should do what is best.

We are well now and getting along all right. I was not well in the winter. We had a severe winter, and it is still very cold. Today it snowed and rained. They are busy in the fields with the sowing.

Anna Holst is dead. Perhaps you heard. Her parents are grieving a great deal. It is a great loss, but it must be borne.

Dorthea Langhoff is now married to Emil Straarup. They have the place that was Bothgaas? near Varmark. (The farm named "Vang" was sold 1907 to Emil Straarup, - the owner until 1907 was A. H. Brasch). Hans Langhoff is a soldier. He went the 10th of April.

It will soon be Jesse's silver wedding, and I must do something about it. I would like to send a wedding gift. I hope they get it. They are mourning, but they are having the wedding just the same. Is Bessie going to be married? Their flock is shrinking.

Marie Jensen has gone to America and is engaged to Jens Winther. You have heard that.

Now there is nothing more to write about so I will close with the best wishes that things will go well with you, from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 22.05.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have your letter of May 6th, and I am happy to hear that you are well. It is too bad that you are not getting my letters. I wrote February 20th, in March, the date of which I don't recall, and April 18th I think was the last. P. Holst has also written. It is a long time since Anna Holst died... March 10th. They mourn her still... it is no wonder. Peter's wife will soon have little Anna instead.

I bought a wedding present for Jesse's silver wedding. I hope they got it. I sent it May 9th, two weeks ago. I was in the Kolding post office with it myself. I can do no more. I also wrote a letter. I have had no answer from them these three weeks.

We are pretty well except that I have rheumatism. Soon I will not be able to walk.

If you write to Tante, will you give them my best wishes. Fru Bogh has just written you. They got a card and she got your address.

First in May it was so warm, then it turned cold. We had to have a fire. Now it is warm again.

If you will send me an envelope... I am not sure of your address.

Now affectionate greetings from your sister and your loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.06.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Thank you for your letters, and I am glad that you are not upset at not getting mine. I am glad too that you are well, but to live on sour milk... that you cannot stand for long.

We are pretty well now. I was sick a long time. It has been a harsh spring. We have had a fire every day lately.

I think you have had my last letter. Peter Holst has written several. They have had a son. It should have been a daughter for Anna Holst.

I am anxious to hear from them (Jesse's). I sent a letter and a package the 8th of May. They could have had a letter back. I think the silver wedding is June 2nd. If you hear from them, let me know.

Everything is going as usual. I think Peter is telling you a little.

I will close with the best wishes and loving greetings from your sister and mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.07.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have today with pleasure received your letter of June 28, and thank you many times for the gift. It is too much. You haven't earned so much the last half year.

Thank God you are well. I think you write the truth. Your sister is not well. She has been in bed lately, but I am pretty well.

Today we are having our first summer. There is a good standing of corn, but my potatoes are not good. They are growing too vigorously from too much rain. Later on they may be good. You could certainly cut the currant bushes again. They cover almost the whole garden. I have got myself a little chicken run and I have Bogh's chickens. Things are strange at Bogh's now. They have no cows. It will soon be over.

There is nothing more to write about.

Best wishes and affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

I have had a letter from Jesse. They got what I sent.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 19.08.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I thank you for your kindness to me. You write so regularly to me. There is certainly no weekly letter from America so regular. I hope you got my last letter. I wrote it in July.

We are well. Dorthea is having a vacation now. She is in Hejls. I expect her home today. It is an unpleasant summer here. It rains every day, and it is so cold that we need some heat in the stove. Around here no one has begun the harvest yet.

I have a keepsake for Iver like Jesse's so they would have something to remind them of home. I will not live till they have a silver wedding. I would like to send one for you but I dare not send it unless you get a permanent place, for I am afraid it would get lost. If I live so long it is possible that you could come home on another visit.

Your Morbroder was talking about your cousin Peder Hald, whom you remember. He should be in Washington if he is living, but it would be strange if you should hear anything of him.

I will close with the best wishes that you may have health and by happy, with affectionate greetings from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.09.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have your letter of August 27th and am glad to hear from you that you are well and happy. The previous one was from the 12th, same month. I do not know whether you wrote in between. If so, it is lost.

We are pretty well. Now it is winter for we have had almost no summer. The harvest is in full swing. It will be late this year before they are finished. We had good weather for two weeks. Then it began to rain, which is not good. The days are becoming short.

You got the letters I wrote last month. I don't know anything to write about. I don't know whether P. Holst is writing to tell you anything. There are many who say: Remember me to Paul when you write. I cannot begin to name all of them. I will mention Hans Schmidt's mother, Hans Jakob Sneker, Stenderupskov. He is having the Golding Wedding tomorrow. They all think it is wonderful that I get so many letters. I am also happy about it.

Now goodnight, little Paul. Affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 10.10.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have now received your last letter and am glad to hear you are well. How happy you are I cannot tell. Thank you for the gift you sent. You are too good to us.

I will tell you that I sent to Jesse and Iver two spoons with my name on and six small ones with Thea's name. Jesse did not write whether they cost anything og how many they got. Iver had to pay USD 3,00 in duty and there were only four small ones. How that happened is not to be understood. They cost exactly the same amount at the jeweler's and the same amount at the post office. I was there myself both times. Had Jesse written it cost so much, I would not have sent to Iver. The jeweler wrapped it for me. That he should have taken two small spoons from the parcel is almost unthinkably annoying. Iver was not pleased about it since he himself had to pay. I hope you get a permanent place by spring so I can send the same to you if I live so long. You will get it just the same.

I am well except for walking. Nor have I much to go after. Harvest is about over here.

Greetings to Tante and Onkel when you write. Affectionate greetings from many friends and especially from sister and mother.

M. Frimann

You must send me an envelope.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 03.12.1907.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is a long time since I have written to you, but I am very grateful that you write so regularly and to hear you are well. I think you will be better when you have a little home. It is a shame to reproach yourself. It is sure to come.

We are fairly well, thank God. We have not had any winter yet, only rain and wind. P. Bogh has barely finished his corn, but it is not worth anything.

We wish you a happy Christmas with contentment and good health - also wishes from Morbroder for a happy Christmas and a good new year. You will get many letters from Denmark for Christmas. I send you greetings from Anna Marie Olesen. She wishes you a happy Christmas and all good. She thinks it is strange you do not get one of the pretty girls you had at home, the ones you flirted with. Now enough of that chatter.

I don't know any more. I am glad that Iver's father-in-law is coming to visit us. We will get to hear something about America.

The Decorah Posten comes all the time, twice a month. Since you haven't ordered it any longer, you should not pay for it.

Now affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 02.01.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

Christmas is over and a new year is beginning, whatever it may bring. I am very grateful to you for the Christmas gifts and the attention you show me.

That we are well I cannot exactly say. I kept Christmas with painful rheumatism, though not bedridden. We have had hard frost since Christmas day but no snow.

I have had letter and Christmas gifts from Iver and Jesse. They wrote nothing about Molly's wedding. You have certainly had many letters from here at home. I hope you got mine. Fru Bogh wrote, Vrang's, the nurse, - Emma Schmidt also wrote. She is in service at Vonsild near Kolding, at J. Skaber's. I don't know her address.

Will you greet Uncle Vind and Tante from me and Morbroder. Wish them a good new year from us. We wish you a good new year.

Affectionate greetings from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 04.03.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have your letter of February 16th and am very grateful to you. I am glad to hear that you are well, and we are also pretty well. I am so glad spring is coming, for the winter has been severe.

If you get less pay, it is perhaps good you are single and have your freedom. How did Jesse come out with his grain that he bought so dear? Is Mollie married, or did that blow over?

Our nurse is leaving now. She is a nice girl. I have not many to talk with. Emma comes now and then. The nurse told me that Emma has a sweetheart. She thinks that Emma has written you herself. Her parents do not like it. I will confess that I had secretly thought you would come after her. She longed for you so much when you went away. She is a good girl. If you should get one, I should hope you get one who is true to you.

Greet aunt if you write to them. Morbroder is well. I have not talked with them for three weeks.

Now most affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.04.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have received your letters of March 22 and 29 and the money and thank you. We were at the confirmation last Sunday and I gave Anna 10 kr. from you. I didn't know what to buy. I also gave a little money. I go nowhere. I should stay at home. I have been so bothered by rheumatism in my back. Also thanks for the flower seeds. Sister was so pleased.

Ida Knudsen I did not give anything because she was confirmed last Easter. She is still at home. They had a little girl last summer. Fru Knudsen's sister, who was at the christening when you were home, is very ill in Haderslev or rather in Flensborg with cancer, and only awaits death. It is very sad.

I had a letter from the nurse. She wanted to write to you. She has been very busy. She got your letter the day she left.

Bogh's place is almost empty. Fru Bogh and Valborg together are all the hands. Bogh has been away nearly two weeks. There is no more to write about that.

Best wishes and affectionate greetings and thanks from sister and mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 15.05.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is time to get a few words written to you. I have had so many pretty cards and loving greetings and am very grateful to you and happy to hear that you are well. That I cannot write, as we are not well. I am not in bed much, though I am better off in bed, but I am afraid to get into the habit of it. But we would be warmer so. Here it is still so cold that we must have fire in the fireplace all the time.

Bogh's promised I would get the house put in order, but I believe now it will come to nothing. I shall see. It may be that I will not stay in the house. Bogh is perhaps not staying long. The farm has been advertised in the paper. It is the end for him. Now he has a little seed corn so perhaps he will stay this summer. He doesn't have much of his land rented out. It is plain he has nothing left... all straw and hay sold so there is not anything on the land.

I have my garden dug and my wood in order. I have a good woodpile for 36 kr.

I have not heard anything from Lina. Didn't she come? I don't know where Kjerskens is. If I were well, I should be glad to see her.

Will you greet Uncle W's if you write and Jesse. Mollie must be married by now, or is it broken off?

I hope you got my last letter of the 17th. Now best wishes and affectionate greetings from your sister and always loving mother, Maren Frimann.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 14.06.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have just received your letter of the 25th of last month and am very glad to hear you are well. We are also pleased with the cards. A letter is a little more to read. I am not writing so often. I think that here there is nothing to write about. If I could talk with you, there would be lots.

We are pretty well. I am not exactly ill, but so plagued with rheumatism I can hardly do anything, sometimes hardly walk. It is like Uncle Wind, but he is older than I am.

You must not be annoyed. You understood of course why I was not so happy about Line's visit. I thought I lacked so much to receive her decently in our house.

If you get other employment you could be free on Sundays. I wish you had a little home for your old age. I know you do not forget your mother. You are the best comfort I have, and God grant you may keep your health and be well.

You wanted to know your sister's birthday. It is July 14th. Then she will be 47 years old.

Affectionate greetings from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.

I am to ask you from Dorthea Holm whether you have Christian Joergensen's address and if you would send it. She thinks he has moved. He is not getting her letters.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.07.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

I have just now received the letter and gift which you sent. I will write at the same time to thank you many times. I am glad to hear that you are well. We are also pretty well, and we can easily get our work done. We have had a long dry spell, but now we are having rain.

Nis Hatt is home from America. He visited me and brought greetings from Iver's family and Tante's. Iver's were well, but Tante was not so well, and Jacob was not in good shape. It is not so good when we are in pain. Nis is going back in August. He has sold his property. Whether he will get more I don't know. He is certainly rich. All his children are married and doing well. Langhoff's I know nothing about. One daughter is married to Emil Straarup. The other is engaged to Ranger Soerensen. He would have liked to have Emma. She didn't like him so got out of it. Her parents wanted it. I hope she will get along all right.

Nothing has been done yet about the house. He has promised to put it into repair. If only I can stay here this winter. I will then have to move. He is selling the farm and the house will follow, so it is hard to tell whether I can stay.

Iver has had another baby. He will soon be an old man. Perhaps they will write to me. They have not written since Christmas.

Will you greet Uncle and Tante Wind from me and from Morbroder. He has not been well lately. I have not talked with him for a long time as I cannot go out.

Best wishes and affectionate greetings to you from sister and your loving mother, Maren Frimann.

You got Christian's address. He is not getting along well. He has had no work in a long time.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 17.08.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Gode Paul,

It is time I got a few words written to you. Thank you for your welcome greetings and card. We are glad to hear that you are well. It is the greatest pleasure I have. I am well now, thank God. Thea is in Hejls now so that she can help the children in the harvest. We have now got the house in shape, but perhaps I will not remain here. If he sells the farm, the house goes, too. He will have work people there... the harvest is now beginning. It is bad weather every day with thunder showers.

There is nothing to write about. I have been thinking about Line, that you have not heard any more from her.

We got our wood in before Thea left. Sine Krog sends you her regards, as do Hans Schmidt's mother, Morbroder, and Vrang's. Morbroder is not so well. Greet Tante from him and from me if you write. I don't know whether Nis Hatt has gone back. They are probably hearing a whole lot at his place.

Now best wishes and affectionate greetings to you from your sister and loving mother, Maren Frimann.



• Bopæl, 1909-1917, Stenholtgade 13, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 53d.
Billedkilde: Sister Maria Columba, Colorado, 2021.

The house was built 1869 and still exists. Restored 1959.

2021, mail from Sister Maria Columba:

"The picture was taken in 1948. Aunt Maren (my mother's sister) went to Denmark and visited the Aagaard family (Cathrine Frimann's family) in Hejls. They showed her this house in Stenderup. The women are Peter Aagaard's wife, Gunder, their daughter, Gudrun, and I don't know who the woman on the right is." It could be the sister in law of Gudrun as her brother Rasmus got married in the church of Hejls 1th June, 1949 to Astrid Johanne Albrechtsen, born 22nd September, 1926 in the parish of Tyrstrup.

• Postcard: from Emma Schmidt to Paul Freeman, 18.04.1909.
Sent from Vonsild to Spokane and to Cheney

Dear friend. How are you? I owe you a letter, but you are getting this little greeting. Is your address the same now, or have you the same place? Spokane? Now your mother will soon move from her old home. I have much news to tell, but hope that this little greeting will find you. Your old friend E.S.

• Postcard: from Emma Schmidt to Paul Freeman, 16.04.1910.
Sent from Stenderup to Sprague

Dear friend. Here just a few words to say thanks for the letter. I greet you from your mother, and don't forget R. Vrang's silver wedding the 19th of June. If only you would send a card for it. The work has begun here on the railroad. We are having a nice spring, after a severe winter. Your mother has bought a house for Thea. Now you are moving, but hope this card reaches you first. Greetings from my parents and friendly wishes to you from Emma Schmidt.

• FT-1911, 01.02.1911, Stenholtgade 13, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 53d. Page 8. A housewife and a widow. Enjoys old age pension. The daughter Dortea is staying with her mother.



• Billede: Stenholtgade 13, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 53d.
Billedkilde: Sister Maria Columba, Colorado, 2021.

Maren Iversdatter Hald, her daughter Dortea Marie, Henriette Knudsen, and Rasmus Juhl's widow (Anne Marie).

Henriette Knudsen was the local midwife. In the cencus of 1901 and 1906 she and her family lived in a house belonging to Peder Christian Bogh. The house was located next to Catrinebjerg to the west and thus a neighbouring house to the Frimann house on the land of Catrinebjerg. The address today: Hundborgvej 4, Sønder Stenderup.

Henriette Nicoline Dorthea Knudsen, born Hansen, died 4th August 1955 in Sønder Stenderup, age 84 years. She was born in Haderslev 15th May, 1871.

Her husband, Christian Georg Carl Knudsen, was a manager of the local dairy which started at Catrinebjerg before it became a cooperative dairy in Sønder Stenderup 1894.

2021, mail from Sister Maria Columba:

"This picture says on the back (my mother's writing): "The house where Bedstemor lived last few years." I don't know the year, but it is Maren, Dortea, Henriette Knudsen, and another neighbour. It should be the house where Maren lived in 1916."

• FT-1916, 01.02.1916, Stenholtgade 13, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 53d. A housewife and a widow. Enjoys old age pension. The daughter Dortea is staying with her mother.

• Letter: from Maren Frimann to Jes Frimann, 06.01.1917.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

You must write if you get this letter.

Dear Son and Daughter,

I thank you many times for the Christmas presents, both the money and the nice slippers. I am very pleased with them. Mine are now too short. I had them resoled. These are warm. I am freezing all the time. I am well, however, but I cannot walk. Sister is not well. We help each other as we can. Living is expensive here now. Our long war goes on, it is hard to get firewood, coal is not to be had or too expensive, and wood is no better.

We have not had a lot of frost but storms and rain, but today it is freezing and snowing.

I wrote in November... whether you got it... to wish you a happy birthday and a good new year and good health.

Affectionate greetings to the children and you from sister, mother, and bedstemoder.

Maren Frimann.


Billede

Maren blev gift med Jacob Jacobsen FRIMANN, søn af Jacob SÖRENSEN og Dorothea JACOBSEN, den 07.10.1854 i hjemmet, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt. (Jacob Jacobsen FRIMANN blev født den 12.04.1825 i Agtrup, Sønder Bjert Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt, dåb den 15.04.1825 i Præstegården, Sønder Bjert Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt, døde den 04.05.1905 i Stenderup By, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt og blev begravet den 10.05.1905 på Sønder Stenderup Kirkegård, Sønder Stenderup Sogn, Nørre Tyrstrup Herred, Vejle Amt.)

punkttegn  Om Jacob og Maren



• Portræt, 1895, Kolding.
Fotograf: Atelier Monberg, C. Løvstrøm, Helligkorsgade 16, Kolding.

Billedkilde: Sister Maria Columba, Colorado, 2021.

Letter from Maren Frimann to Paul Freeman, 21.6.1895:
"I am sending you our photograph in a few days. Best wishes from your parents."

• Letter: from Christiane Bogh to Paul Freeman, 11.09.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Cathrineberg, 11th September, 1904

Dear Paul,

I dare say you will be surprised to get a letter from me, whom you perhaps scarcely remember. But now that it is approaching the 7th of October when, if all goes well, your dear old parents will celebrate that rare festival, the Golden Wedding, I have promised your mother to write a bit to you and inform you how the two old people are. And if possible, you will be able to come home to celebrate their great day with them. Your old father is nearing the grave, and now perhaps he will not be permitted to experience the wonderful celebration since he is very feeble, is up and down in bed as best he can. Your mother, however, is well and has hardly changed at all. I cannot remember her as being different. Dorthea also is not well and is permanently at home with the old people. You can imagine, dear Paul, what joy you would give your dear old parents, and also yourself, if you could come home now for the Golden Wedding the 7th of October. I think you should come if at all possible. It is your parents' constant hope... if only Paul would come! Think of the large flock of children... they have now only Dorthea left. We live only once... and then to think that the two old people will die without ever seeing any of you again is a great sorrow. It is not so difficult to come home now and takes only a few days.

You wonder, I suppose, that I write to you with the familiar du, but in my thoughts you still remain as Little Paul. You remember how fond of you I was.

That is now a long time ago. Write to us and tell us a little about American conditions. My husband and I would be interested in hearing that.

Now I hope you receive my letter in time and come as soon as possible, but write a few words before.

Best wishes from your two old parents, Dorthea, my husband, and Christiane Bogh.

• Guldbryllup, 07.10.1904, "Catrinebjerg", Stenderupvej 183, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 2a.
Sister Maria Columba, Colorado, 2021:

The Bogh's (Peder Christian Bogh and his wife Christiane) were very good to the Frimanns, especially at the time of their Golden Wedding in 1904, helping Maren to prepare for it. The celebration was held partly at the Frimann house, which Christiane had helped decorate, even putting wallpaper on the walls. Jacob was very frail by that time, but Bedstefar (Poul Jacobsen Frimann) wrote a note on the anniversary card: "Father danced at the Golden Wedding." He was not able to be there himself as he had not been able to save enough money for a trip back to Denmark."

• Letter: from Christiane Bogh to Paul Freeman, 13.10.1904.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Cathrineberg, 13th October, 1904

Dear Paul,

I received your letter today and thank you for it, and I will write to you at once and tell you about your dear old parents' Golden Wedding, which I think you would like to know a little about. I can say that it was a lovely day for the two old people. The old home was polished up both outside and inside as well as we knew how, and the wedding couple had for the first time wallpaper on in the parlor and small curtains up, which your mother had said would never go up but which she permitted for this occasion.

The loom was moved out and the room put in order and decorated also in there, and a table was set for coffee and chocolate in both rooms for the forty guests who were invited. Dorthea's kitchen was also made pleasant so the guests could sit there if they wanted to. At three o'clock in the afternoon the guests came. Niels Holst with family, old Mads Krestensen, Sandager's, Niels Smed's, J. Bruhn, my brother's, Tulstrup's, Vrang's, your father's family, Berg's, Knudsen's, Fru Juhl, and we from Cathrineberg. The weather was beautiful, and the two old people were in their best finery. Your mother looked fine. On the other hand, your father has declined, although he was fairly well that day.

After we had drunk coffee and chocolate ever so cozily and sat and chatted, we all walked a bit in our garden and were here in Cathrineberg where my husband played and entertained them. Meanwhile the table was set in the old home, and had you been able to peep in, dear Paul, you would not have known it, so festive was it all within, with Father and Mother as honored guests. The meal was prepared at Cathrineberg and included roast beef and roast pork with red wine and kransekage and apple cake with white wine. From the place of honor to the many guests Berg made a speech to the wedding couple and presented to them at that time a gift of money from the Stenderup townspeople of 135 kr., to the great pleasure of the old people. My husband made a speech for Sister Dorthea and regretted that she was the only one attending of the large family of children, which cost Mother and Father tears from the thoughts of the three dear absent ones, to whom we all send many good wishes with the hope that the old people may be permitted to see their Paul again before they close their eyes forever. For Jes and Iver there is small hope for they are building their families, so remember, dear Paul, they are still waiting day and night for your visit. Your mother says, "I would like to see Paul again, but then it would be hard for us to say goodbye to him again, but God's will be done".

After the meal we had a cozy talk with coffee, and it was about 12:30 before we said goodnight to the two old people, whose faces beamed with joy and appreciation for all the honor given them on their great festive day.

Today I was at your parents' and read to them the letter you sent me, which they were glad to hear, as well as your letter to them with the enclosed gift of money, for which they were very grateful, and they asked me to greet you and say thanks for that. They are both well, and they are still very happy about the wedding party.

You asked about Sinnet. She is married in Svendborg and soon will have a child. My husband is, I am sorry to say, plagued with rheumatism and has had to stay in bed a long time, but fortunately he was able to be up for the celebration.

Peter Bogh continues the letter:

Yes, little Paul, a few more words I think. Thanks for being kind enough to write to me.

My wife has already given you an account of your old parents' wedding party. It would have been so charming if you children had been present for the old folks... but the many hundreds of miles which lie between you place an insurmountable obstacle in the way. If you see Jes and Iver, you must give them a greeting from me. Remember to ask Jes whether he can remember the day I drove him to Kolding to leave for America. Jes said then to me that it was so strange for him to think that when we two next saw each other we would be old men. Yes, it strikes me now that I am going on my 45th year, and Jes is 50. God knows whether Jes will ever come home again. Still I have a firm belief that you will come, little Paul. Your father is very feeble and will not be living long, so it can hardly be perhaps that you will see him in this life. However, your mother is very well. They were both very pleased with the wedding party.

Now, little Paul, I will talk no more about it, and I close with kindest greetings from your old parents and sister, and likewise I send you a hearty good greeting from my wife and your devoted, Bogh.



• Bopæl: "Catrinebjerg", Stenderupvej 183, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 2a.
Billedkilde: Sister Maria Columba, Colorado, 2021.

The Frimann house was located right to the west of Catrinebjerg on the land of Catrinebjerg, and it does not exist today. It was demolished when Catrinebjerg was sold 1909.

2021, mail from Sister Maria Columba:

"I think that this picture was taken in 1906. In fact, this one says 1906 on the back".

We have found a description of the house, written by Paul Freeman:

"The trees back of the house are on the line between Bogh's farm and our house. The house was brought from somewhere else and rebuilt. The folks lived here many years and celebrated their Golden Wedding. When Father died, Mother and Thea moved away, and the house was torn down".



• Bopæl, 1906, "Catrinebjerg", Stenderupvej 183, Sønder Stenderup, matr. 2a.
Billedkilde: Sister Maria Columba, Colorado, 2021.

The Frimann house was located right to the west of Catrinebjerg on the land of Catrinebjerg, and it does not exist today. Probably it was demolished when Catrinebjerg was sold 1909.

2021, mail from Sister Maria Columba:

"There are several references in 1906 in letters from Maren Frimann and from Christiane Bogh regarding this. Another picture was taken by "Valborg" at Catrinebjerg which Christiane sent in February 1906 and said, "Can you recognize your mother and Dorthea?"

• Letter: from Christiane Bogh to Paul Freeman, 22.02.1906.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

Cathrineberg, 22nd February, 1906

Dear Paul,

From your mother I heard today that you did not receive the letter I wrote you at Christmas. I am very sorry about that and cannot understand how it could happen. I had put in it a photograph of the old house that Valborg (Voldborg Marente Lauritsen, b. 1886) had taken, but it was not better than the one that I am sending you today. Today your mother had a letter from the photographer Burcharth in Kolding saying that you had written to him about coming out here to photograph the house, but your mother has written to him that she would rather have it photographed next spring. Now she has decided that Painter Skov shall come one day and photograph it, so you will be sent a picture before long.

Dorthea is sick and staying in bed, but today she is better. I drop by there every day. Your mother is well except for at little rheumatism here and there, but she is otherwise happy and of good heart. She longs a great deal for her dear Paul, and you are in her thoughts first and last. How good it is of you, dear Paul, that you write so frequently to her. The old soul, it is now the only joy she has. I have permission to read all your letters, which are always so welcome. There are unfortunately so few children who, when they go out in the world, remember their old parents, but you can be sure that your dear old mother realizes your love and consideration for her. We talk about it often, your mother and I, that you write so often that we do not always remember that you are so far away. Can you understand how beautiful a thought and how touching that is for your mother?

We are both well here. Of news here you will have seen long ago that our dear old king died the 29th of January. He died without previous illness. There were such goings on in Koebenhavn as never had been seen in our country for any king's funeral service, for he was so honored by and so popular with all from high to low. Sunday he was buried, and on that day Stenderup's church was beautifully decorated as never before with great quantities of candles and evergreens with their scent.

I am happy to see from your letters that you are well and content and do not seem at all homesick for Denmark, which I can hardly understand since you have so many good friends here.

On Sunday we are invited to Binderup for the engagement of the oldest daughter with a stranger whom we do not know.

For the last two weeks we have had mission weeks at the church, which have been well attended.

We have been busy cutting wood in our forest, but there is difficulty in getting it home since the roads are so bad, and we have had no frost for at long time. Your mother gets her wood at our place, and my husband has promised to carry it right to her door, and that has taken a load off her mind. You know when old people have one thing and another they want attended to, it is important to them. The lock on the outer door is now in order so there is no one who can steel your mother or Dorthea.

I would wish for your mother's sake that she might be permitted to keep Dorthea a little yet. She is very weak, and we all hope that she will go before your mother, which is her sincere wish, but still I wish a bit that she might keep her, though Dorthea is certainly sometimes a little odd. I believe, on the other hand, your mother would miss her, and the two belong together for a while.

In Stenderup it looks just like when you were home, with the difference that we now have winter and dark, sad air, while when you were here we had the loveliest summer. It was nice for you, dear Paul, that the weather was so beatiful when you were home. When are you coming again? I always say that if Dorthea should die first, shouldn't your mother go to America? I think she would do that for your sake, the dear old soul. Nej, it is a shame to move her from the old home where she has lived her days in good times and bad, so you let her do as she wishes. So long as you have only yourself, your old mother is the best you have. I know that, dear Paul, and you are a good son to her.

Write to me when you can. Put it in your mother's letter. And I shall write to you again.

Here are the pictures of the house. Can you recognize your mother and Dorthea? Also a picture of Cathrineberg from the courtyard, which Valborg also took. It is better than that of the old house.

Many greetings from my husband and your affectionate, Christiane Bogh.

• Postcard: from Peder Christian Bogh to Paul Freeman, 08.01.1908.
Translated from Danish by Eleanor Freeman.

To Spokane

Dear little Paul,

Sincere thanks to you for your kind letter which you sent me. I was very pleased to get it, and I am glad that you are well. It is gentlemanlike of you to write to your old mother every week. Thanks for that. Another time you will get a proper letter from me. Wishing you a happy Christmas and a blessed New Year from my wife and your affectionate, P. Bogh.


punkttegn  Parnotater:

Indt. kirkebog. Bevilling til vielse i huset fra Haderslev Amthus af 11. september 1854.



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Denne hjemmeside blev lavet 30.01.2023 med Legacy 9.0 fra MyHeritage; indholdsophavsret og vedligeholdelse af bellevue250(snabela)gmail.com